Submit a talk proposal for BlogTalk 2009, Social Software Conference in Korea this September! (Final Call)

Here’s an update regarding BlogTalk 2009, the 6th International Conference on Social Software. BlogTalk Asia will be held in Jeju, Korea from 15th-16th September.

We hope that you can submit a proposal to speak at BlogTalk: the deadline is the 31st July 2009. A one-page abstract (less than 600 words) is required. http://2009.blogtalk.net/callforproposals

Why attend?

BlogTalk provides a unique interdisciplinary opportunity for academics, developers and practitioners to come together and discuss social software projects, ideas, research prototypes or success stories.

What is the structure?

As with previous events, we will have a mixture of peer-reviewed presentations, keynote speakers, discussion panels and special sessions (including one on the Korean Social Web). Previous events in the series have featured prominent speakers such as David Weinberger, Mena and Ben Trott, Matt Mullenweg, Suw Charman, Danah Boyd, Salim Ismail and Nova Spivack.

Why Jeju?

Jeju’s temperate climate, natural scenery, and beaches make it a popular tourist destination for both South Koreans and many visitors from Japan, China, northern and southern Asia. The Cheonjeyeon and Cheonjiyeon waterfalls, Mountain Halla, Hyeobje Cave, Hyeongje Island are popular places for tourists. Jeju Island was a finalist in the new ‘Seven Wonders of Nature’, and contains a Natural World Heritage Site (Jeju Volcanic Island and Lava Tubes). In the conference venue (Jungmum Resort Complex) and associated hotels, there are also many bars, casinos, pools, etc.

Jeju is easily accessible from many parts of Asia, with flights to Tokyo, Beijing, Osaka and Hong Kong. You can also fly to Seoul and from there take a one hour flight to Jeju. http://2009.blogtalk.net/travelling

We will have special hotel rates in top-class hotels at the conference venue. http://2009.blogtalk.net/accommodation

Also, BlogTalk will be held just before the Lift Asia event on the 17th and 18th, so you have double the reason to attend! There is a special joint registration rate for both events.

What people have said about BlogTalk

“Discussed what blogs are useful for and why they are changing…”
“Good to see what academics and those in business have in common…”
“Detailed and informative!”
“Inspiring!”
“Highly relevant. Small. Great mix of people from different backgrounds.”
“Well-organised and a great selection of speakers and topics. A useful and productive time.”

Programme Committee

Gabriela Avram, University of Limerick
Anne Bartlett-Bragg, Headshift
Mark Bernstein, Eastgate Systems Inc.
Stephanie Booth, Climb to the Stars
Rob Cawte, Web 2.0 Japan
Josephine Griffith, National University of Ireland, Galway
Steve Han, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
Conor Hayes, Digital Enterprise Research Institute
Jin-Ho Hur, NeoWiz
Ajit Jaokar, FutureText Publishing
Alexandre Passant, Digital Enterprise Research Institute
Robert Sanzalone, pacificIT
Jan Schmidt, Hans Bredow Institute
Hideaki Takeda, National Institute of Informatics

Contact us

blogtalk2009@gmail.com
@blogtalk on Twitter

Thanks!

John Breslin, Thomas Burg, Honggee Kim
Channy Yun, Haklae Kim

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Interview with wetoku about BlogTalk 2009 (Jeju, Korea) and social software

I was interviewed by David Lee, founder of video interview site wetoku, this morning about the forthcoming BlogTalk 2009 in Korea.

(I apologise for the echo, I didn’t have any headphones so was causing some feedback.)

wetoku is a very interesting service that anyone can use, whereby interviews are simply carried out through a web browser that requests a connection to your webcam and mike. It shows the interviewer on one side and the interviewee on the other, and in a backchannel, the interviewee can ask questions of the interviewer via a text box (for clarifications, etc.: these are not shown in the final video). A nice review of wetoku was recently published on Read/Write Web. You can also follow @wetoku on Twitter.

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Olympian John Treacy Praises Sports & [Exercise] Engineering Degree at NUI Galway

Pictured at the launch of NUI Galway’s B.E. in Sports & Exercise Engineering were (left-right) the University President, Dr James J. Browne; Professor Ó Laighin, Head of Electrical & Electronic Engineering at NUI Galway and Course Director; one of the first students on the new course, Ruaidhrí Molloy; and John Treacy, CEO of the Irish Sports Council.
Pictured at the launch of NUI Galway’s B.E. in Sports & Exercise Engineering were (left-right) the University President, Dr James J. Browne; Professor Ó Laighin, Head of Electrical & Electronic Engineering at NUI Galway and Course Director; one of the first students on the new course, Ruaidhrí Molloy; and John Treacy, CEO of the Irish Sports Council.

From http://www.nuigalway.ie/news/main_press.php?p_id=1069:

Olympic silver medallist and former double World Cross Country Champion, John Treacy, today (Friday, 10 July) officially launched NUI Galway’s B.E. in Sports & Exercise Engineering.

The degree programme, which incorporates significant elements of Anatomy, Physiology, and Mechanical Engineering with a major in Electronic Engineering, puts particular emphasis on ambulatory monitoring of human performance, movement assessment, and systems and devices for the assessment of sport and exercise.

Speaking at the launch, John Treacy, who is now CEO of the Irish Sports Council, said: “This whole area is hugely important. I see tremendous potential in this combination of engineering and sports science. In elite sports we deal with tenths and hundredths of seconds. Winning often comes down to a technical edge so having professionals trained in Ireland in this area will be of great benefit”.

The first cohort of students taking this focused interdisciplinary programme have just finished first year and are destined to graduate with a unique skillset for a growing industry according to NUI Galway’s Professor Gearóid Ó Laighin.

Professor Ó Laighin is Head of Electrical & Electronic Engineering and Course Director: “Professional sport is a worldwide multi-billion euro industry and plays a central role in most western societies. Today technology is used on a regular basis to improve sports performance in elite athletes. The Sports & Exercise Engineering programme at NUI Galway will provide graduates with the skills and expertise to design systems and devices for the evaluation and execution of sport performance across a broad range of sports”.

Professor Ó Laighin sees the Exercise Engineering component of the programme becoming increasingly important. Exercise Engineering is expected to play an important role in the management of two major healthcare crises for the Western World, obesity and ageing populations. “There are numerous health benefits associated with physical activity, including a reduced risk of premature mortality and reduced risks of coronary heart disease. Regular participation in physical activity also appears to reduce depression and anxiety, improve mood, and enhance ability to perform daily tasks throughout the life span. Exercise Engineers will design systems and devices to promote increased adherence to exercise”.

The programme in Sports & Exercise Engineering is offered by the College of Engineering & Informatics in collaboration with the College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences at NUI Galway.

As part of their studies, Sports & Exercise Engineering students use the facilities in the newly opened Sports Centre at NUI Galway. A new high-spec Engineering Building will add to facilities on campus by 2011.

NUI Galway is also offering two additional new Engineering degrees, which will have the first student intake in September. These are B.E. degrees in Energy Systems Engineering, and Engineering Innovation – Electronic.

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Open government and Linked Data; now it's time to draft…

For the past few months, there have been a variety of calls for feedback and suggestions on how the US Government can move towards becoming more open and transparent, especially in terms of their dealings with citizens and also for disseminating information about their recent financial stimulus package.

As part of this, the National Dialogue forum was set up to solicit solutions for ways of monitoring the “expenditure and use of recovery funds”. Tim Berners-Lee wrote a proposal on how linked open data could provide semantically-rich, linkable and reusable data from Recovery.gov. I also blogged about this recently, detailing some ideas for how discussions by citizens on the various uses of expenditure (represented using SIOC and FOAF) could be linked together with financial grant information (in custom vocabularies).

More recently, the Open Government Initiative solicited ideas for a government that is “more transparent, participatory, and collaborative”, and the brainstorming and discussion phases have just ended. This process is now in its third phase, where the ideas proposed to solve various challenges are to be more formally drafted in a collaborative manner.

What is surprising about this is how few submissions and contributions have been put into this third and final phase (see graph below), especially considering that there is only one week for this to be completed. Some topics have zero submissions, e.g. “Data Transparency via Data.gov: Putting More Data Online”.

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This doesn’t mean that people aren’t still thinking about this. On Monday, Tim Berners-Lee published a personal draft document entitled “Putting Government Data Online“. But we need more contributions from the Linked Data community to the drafts during phase three of the Open Government Directive if we truly believe that this solution can make a difference.

For those who want to learn more about Linked Data, click on the image below to go to Tim Berners-Lee’s TED talk on Linked Data.

(I watched it again today, and added a little speech bubble to the image below to express my delight at seeing SIOC profiles on the Linked Open Data cloud slide.)

We also have a recently-established Linked Data Research Centre at DERI in NUI Galway.

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BlogTalk 2009 (6th International Social Software Conference) – Call for Proposals – September 1st and 2nd – Jeju, Korea

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BlogTalk 2009
The 6th International Conf. on Social Software
September 1st and 2nd, 2009
Jeju Island, Korea

Overview

Following the international success of the last five BlogTalk events, the next BlogTalk – to be held in Jeju Island, Korea on September 1st and 2nd, 2009 – is continuing with its focus on social software, while remaining committed to the diverse cultures, practices and tools of our emerging networked society. The conference (which this year will be co-located with Lift Asia 09) is designed to maintain a sustainable dialog between developers, innovative academics and scholars who study social software and social media, practitioners and administrators in corporate and educational settings, and other general members of the social software and social media communities.

We invite you to submit a proposal for presentation at the BlogTalk 2009 conference. Possible areas include, but are not limited to:

  • Forms and consequences of emerging social software practices
  • Social software in enterprise and educational environments
  • The political impact of social software and social media
  • Applications, prototypes, concepts and standards

Participants and proposal categories

Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the conference, audiences will come from different fields of practice and will have different professional backgrounds. We strongly encourage proposals to bridge these cultural differences and to be understandable for all groups alike. Along those lines, we will offer three different submission categories:

  • Academic
  • Developer
  • Practitioner

For academics, BlogTalk is an ideal conference for presenting and exchanging research work from current and future social software projects at an international level. For developers, the conference is a great opportunity to fly ideas, visions and prototypes in front of a distinguished audience of peers, to discuss, to link-up and to learn (developers may choose to give a practical demonstration rather than a formal presentation if they so wish). For practitioners, this is a venue to discuss use cases for social software and social media, and to report on any results you may have with like-minded individuals.

Submitting your proposals

You must submit a one-page abstract of the work you intend to present for review purposes (not to exceed 600 words). Please upload your submission along with some personal information using the EasyChair conference area for BlogTalk 2009. You will receive a confirmation of the arrival of your submission immediately. The submission deadline is June 27th, 2009.

Following notification of acceptance, you will be invited to submit a short or long paper (four or eight pages respectively) for the conference proceedings. BlogTalk is a peer-reviewed conference.

Timeline and important dates

  • One-page abstract submission deadline: June 27th, 2009
  • Notification of acceptance or rejection: July 13th, 2009
  • Full paper submission deadline: August 27th, 2009

(Due to the tight schedule we expect that there will be no deadline extension. As with previous BlogTalk conferences, we will work hard to endow a fund for supporting travel costs. As soon as we review all of the papers we will be able to announce more details.)

Topics

Application Portability
Bookmarking
Business
Categorisation
Collaboration
Content Sharing
Data Acquisition
Data Mining
Data Portability
Digital Rights
Education
Enterprise
Ethnography
Folksonomies and Tagging
Human Computer Interaction
Identity
Microblogging
Mobile
Multimedia
Podcasting
Politics
Portals
Psychology
Recommender Systems
RSS and Syndication
Search
Semantic Web
Social Media
Social Networks
Social Software
Transparency and Openness
Trend Analysis
Trust and Reputation
Virtual Worlds
Web 2.0
Weblogs
Wikis
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